ELITE Certificate – Entrepreneurship & Innovation Courses

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ENTREPRENEURSHIP AND INNOVATION
Course Description *Click course title for syllabus linkAdmin InfoNext Session DetailsSummer 2017Fall 2017Winter 2018
APS1012H: Management of Innovation and Change in EngineeringSection Code S:
Add Date Deadline: May 30
Drop Date Deadline: June 2
SUMMER 2017: May 29th to June 2nd & June12th to 16th, Daily from 9am-12pm in SF3201
Please note on June 1 & 15 class will be held in room SF2202

FALL 2017: Information to be updated when available
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APS1013H: Applying Innovation in EngineeringWINTER 2018: Information to be updated when availablex
APS1015H: Social EntrepreneurshipIt is strongly recommended that students who are interested in the course attend the first lecture including waitlist students.WINTER 2018: January 8 to April 6, Wednesdays 3pm-6pm (Location TBD)x
APS1023H: New Product InnovationCourse Requires Instructor Approval

Section Code S:
Add Date Deadline: May 19
Drop Date Deadline: June 15
SUMMER 2017: May 11th to July 27th, Thursdays from 6pm-8pm in BA 2135

FALL 2017: September 11 to December 8, Thursdays from 6pm-8pm (Location TBD)
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APS1033H: Innovation via ImagineeringFALL 2017: September 11 to December 8, Tuesdays from 6pm-9pm (Location TBD)x
APS1035H: Technology Sales for EntrepreneursFALL 2017: September 11 to December 8, Tuesdays from 6pm-9pm (Location TBD)x
APS1036H: Formative Experiential Entrepreneurial Learning (FEEL)WINTER 2018: January 8 to April 6, Wednesdays from 12pm-3pm (Location TBD)x
APS1088H: Business Planning and Execution for Canadian EntrepreneursFALL 2017: September 11 to December 8, Mondays from 6pm-9pm (Location TBD)x

APS1012H: Management of Innovation and Change in Engineering

APS1012H Syllabus

Stephen Armstrong

The course will provide students with the core concepts of innovation including; strategic thinking, transformational change management, innovative enterprise design & development, and sustaining a culture of innovation. This seminar style course will equip students with the knowledge and the skills to manage innovation at strategic and operational levels. The management of innovation is interdisciplinary and multi-functional, requiring the international and alignment of market forces, technological systems and organizational change to improve the competitiveness and effectiveness of organizations and society. We shall argue that the process of innovation management is essentially generic, although organization, technological and market specific factors will constrain choices and actions. This course will incorporate both academic readings to provide the broad theory of innovation but most of the readings and discussion will be based on the instructors many years of hands on practical experience in innovation in a variety of industry sectors.


APS1013H: Applying Innovation in Engineering

APS1013H Syllabus

Stephen Armstrong

Applying Innovation will teach students the application of the tools and techniques of innovation management including; strategic and systems thinking, business process management, creativity and problem solving, solution design & implementation, effective organizational teamwork and project management. This seminar style course aims to equip students with the knowledge and skills to apply the tools of creativity and innovation to solve a real world technological business problem. Applying innovation will enable students in a team approach to actually use the tools in the class and on an industrial project either at their employer (preferably) or an external enterprise. This course will also incorporate both academic scholarly papers that will build on the readings in the Management of Innovation APS1012 course. In addition the instructor will provide coaching based on many years of hands on practical experience solving technological problems in a variety of industry sectors. Though not mandatory it would be ideal if students have completed the course APS1012 – Management of Innovation that provides students with a conceptual understanding of the broad field of strategic innovation.


APS1015H: Social Entrepreneurship

APS1015H Syllabus

Norm Tasevski & Alex Kjorven

This course is designed for engineering students interested in starting a business venture that advances social and/or environmental good. The course provides students with as real a “social entrepreneurship” experience as is possible within a course setting – students will, independently or in groups, construct a Business Model for their entrepreneurial idea, and will pitch their model to a panel of Angel investors. Most lectures will run workshop-style: industry experts (in social marketing, social finance, HR, law and other fields), along with real social entrepreneurs, will work one-on-one with students to help refine their business models in preparation for the investment pitch. Other lectures, along with course readings, will focus on understanding the field of social entrepreneurship, with a particular emphasis on topics relevant to engineering such as clean tech commercialization and the growing field of “impact investing”


APS1023H: New Product Innovation

APS1023H Syllabus

Amir Rahim

This course examines technical and organizational aspects of managing new products and process innovations. Topics include human creativity and problem solving, product design and development, product feasibility assessments, requirements engineering, managing research and development, project management, team communication, technology implementation, and innovation strategy.


APS1033H: Innovation via Imagineering

APS1033H Syllabus

Joseph C. Paradi

This course will train the students to use their technical skills and problem solving abilities to identify where the world around them will be 10 or more years from now. The core goal is to assess opportunities many years out and using “Imagineering” to identify business opportunities. Topics covered include the assessment of what future technological challenges will emerge and how to find the business opportunities to solve such problems in both private and public contexts. The students will learn how seek business opportunities for their firms or themselves and communicate such vision to decision makers. The delivery is via 12 three hour sessions with a mix of lectures, outside speakers, group work and presentations on topics on emerging/future opportunities. Topics may include the social problems of wastewater engineering, air/particulate emissions, traffic engineering, project definition and financing and others. A highly interactive environment will encourage out of the box thinking and innovative approaches to large problems. There will be a number of assignments, projects and a term report. Class interaction with grading will be done in 6 of the sessions where both individual and group presentations will be required. Cases will be used for some of the projects. There will be no written final examination.


APS1035H: Technology Sales for Entrepreneurs

APS1035H Syllabus

Steve Treiber

At some point in their careers most engineers and scientists they find themselves with the need to convince their boss, their company, their co-workers, or a client to try some new idea. That new idea, product or service might be so novel that there are no easy comparisons to be made to something existing and proven. This is the crux of the innovator’s dilemma and the title of a famous book by Clayton Christensen1. Most science and engineering schools teach their students how to organize their data and facts. Through group projects students are exposed to the need to argue their point of view, negotiate compromise, and then present their results and ideas to their professors to get the best marks.

Many schools also give students an opportunity to develop business plans. However, very few schools teach their students how to sell their technological ideas to a complex audience who often have conflicting views and needs, and perhaps limited technical knowledge, but who all have some influence on the decision. In fact, in most cases the decision makers have little or no technical competence in the specific subject in question and the engineer/scientist’s argument often comes down to “trust me”.

The course is all about how to get people to listen and gain enough trust in you to take a chance on your offer. Students will learn the keys to selling a “customer” on an idea, product or service that they passionately believe in. The course is designed to have a variety of learning objectives which are delivered via lectures, exercises, role playing, group presentations and homework assignments. The students will learn how to organize and communicate their thoughts and facts in a way that will increase their probability of succeeding in convincing the decision makers that they should take a chance on a new idea or innovation.

Some students may come with or develop real, viable ideas. In those cases the instructor may introduce them to the Hatchery or one of the many incubators and accelerators on campus and in the GTA, and even commercial companies that might have an interest in their product or service.


APS1036H: Formative Experiential Entrepreneurial Learning (FEEL)

APS1036H Syllabus

Joseph Orozco

FEELTM is an experiential learning opportunity that provides students with a real world application of the entrepreneurship mindset and creates a forum for mentorship and knowledge exchange. The course is structured as a process to define a business model and the creation of a pitch for a startup. FEELTM will encourage entrepreneurial thinking and the promotion of a mindset that acknowledges uncertainty and limited resources in today’s world. Students will be guided on the use of tools for team building, user insight generation, rapid prototyping, business model generation canvas and pitching. Students will be working in teams and empowered to develop original business solutions for the problems they will encounter in today’s world. This course will also provide students with an understanding, guidance and access to resources in University of Toronto’s current start-up eco-system, featuring the Entrepreneurship Hatchery at the FASE.


APS1088H: Business Planning and Execution for Canadian Entrepreneurs

APS1088 Syllabus

Steve Treiber & Joseph C. Paradi

The key to entrepreneurial success is focused execution of a great business plan. APS1088 teaches aspiring entrepreneurs how to start a business in Canada. That business could be a start-up, a franchise, or an acquired or inherited business. The business could be for profit or non-profit. Each lecture focusses on an important aspect of starting and running a business, and supports a component of the business plan each student writes as the course project.

• Start-up financing taught addresses all forms from bootstrapping to seeking funding from VCs and Angel investors.

• If you already have a business idea the course will assist you in making that business idea a success and if you don’t have an idea the course will teach you how to find and develop a successful business idea. The instructors may introduce students with exceptionally good business plans to The Hatchery, or one of the many incubators on campus, or even businesses that might be interested in their idea.

• The lecturers who present this course have all started and sold at least one successful business and have contributed their experience to the class notes. Interestingly, we are all immigrants to Canada like the majority of our students and that fact strongly influences the course material and our approach to teaching.

• At strategic points during the course, subject matter experts are invited to address the students in their area of specialty such as marketing strategy, sales, finance & accounting and law.